You are currently browsing the monthly archive for January 2007.

One of Google’s newer features is the Google Co-op where you can setup a range of sites for Google to search before it goes off to the rest of the web.

Thought I’d try this and setup one to search WMQ related sites. So try this out the WMQ Google Co-op

Not sure yet how useful this will be… but let me know!

Advertisements

XMS is a non-Java implementation of the Java Message Service (JMS) API, currently implemented to work with the IBM WebSphere messaging portfolio.

XMS can connect to the following IBM messaging servers — WebSphere MQ; WebSphere Platform Messaging, for example, as embodied by the default messaging provider in WebSphere Application Server v6; and WebSphere Event/Message Brokers over Real-time transport.

An XMS application can exchange messages with any of the following types of application – An XMS application, a WebSphere MQ JMS application, a native WebSphere MQ application and a JMS application that is using the WebSphere Platform Messaging. XMS applications may use different IBM messaging servers with little or no change.

A C/C++ implementation of this technology is available as ‘IBM Message Service Client for C/C++’. This can be downloaded as a Cat3 SupportPac here.

Likewise, a .NET implementation of this technology is available as ‘IBM Message Service Client for .NET’. This can be downloaded as a Cat3 SupportPac here.

One of the nice things about starting out with WebSphere MQ is that 90-day free trials are available to try it out. But what happens if, after trying it out (and paying for it!), you decide you like it and want to keep the environment you’ve spent the last ninety days setting up? Many new users don’t realize that it is possible to upgrade your trial setup to the full product, without needing to reinstall WMQ or recreate their queue managers.

Read the rest of this entry »